Theology and BBT

The Big Bang Theory: From Caricature to Complexity (Peter Augustine Lawler): “The Big Bang Theory ultimately points to the limited but real wisdom that comes from understanding two partial truths—that of the personal, judgmental, loving God and also that of the ‘God of nature’ the scientists seek to understand. The show leads us to think about how to put together the two explanations of ‘the Big Bang’—one based on faith in a personal Creator and one based on scientific discovery of the impersonal laws of nature—to account truthfully for both nature and human nature.”

In Praise of Coffee

Coffee is the very beverage of the people of God, and the cordial of his servants who thirst for wisdom. When coffee is infused into the bowl, it exhales the odor of musk, and is of the color of ink. The truth is not known except to the wise who drink it from the foaming coffee cup. God has deprived fools of coffee, who with invincible obstinacy condemn its use as injurious.
— Journal of the Transylvanian Medical Society, 1834

Weekly Reading – Herodotus

Fresh out of Guardian columns, but here’s this week’s reading nonetheless. Just wound up the new translation of Herodotus’s The Histories, by Tom Holland. It’s a fine version, although idiomatically modern in many places. But that does serve to make the text more immediate, and probably more like what the initial audience in Athens would have heard. Highly recommended, and much better than getting your Thermopylae by way of Frank Miller.

Masons & Catholics, no Monty Python

“Indeed, much of European and American politics over the past two centuries has involved a running and often bitter confrontation between Masons and Catholics. Why is that?”

Follow the link to see why, as Philip Jenkins continues his discussion. It also shows how much, perhaps, of the past had to be forgotten to reach our more ecumenical age. I’m sure the reporter who asked me about this was expecting to hear that there was no problem any more.

And indeed, in the United States, there probably would not be. But how much of that would simply be due to not taking these things as seriously as our forebears did, rather than actual growth in understanding?

Odd Combo: Freemasonry, Monty Python, Catholicism

“You absolutely cannot understand the British Empire without masonry”

Monty Python was right!

But still interesting; I’m going to look forward to the next few posts along these lines. Always admired Philip Jenkins‘s scholarship.

Ironically, a few years ago, a reporter asked me about the prohibition against Catholics becoming Masons. I’d thought it had dropped out, but it turned out that it’s still in force.

Depth dimension with your beverage

Five Oldest Pubs in the United Kingdom – Anglotopia.net: “The Old Ferry Boat is a great example of one of the pubs that started as an inn and still operates as such today. Though no documents apparently exist of when the Inn actually began, one record stated that liquor was served there as early as 560 A.D. and the foundations are reportedly another century older.”

Mind-boggling witness to some of the continuities possible in the Old World.

Law Schools’ Applications Fall as Costs Rise and Jobs Are Cut – NYT

Law school applications are headed for a 30-year low, reflecting increased concern over soaring tuition, crushing student debt and diminishing prospects of lucrative employment upon graduation.

One for my students as they contemplate the future.

Law Schools’ Applications Fall as Costs Rise and Jobs Are Cut – NYT

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – SlateMagazine

Can I let you in on a secret? Typing two spaces after a period is totally, completely, utterly, and inarguably wrong.

Truth from Sinai.

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. – Slate Magazine